On a mission, conservation of wildlife and landscapes!

Litter Frogs

Megophryids is the largest and most diversified family of Old World frogs. These frogs range from Pakistan, India, extending eastward into southeast Asia, Borneo and the Philippines to the Sunda Islands. They range in size from about 20 to 125 mm. Some are large, cryptic, forest-floor dwellers with adaptations to eat large prey. Their skin is modified so that they resemble dead leaves on the forest floor. Some species have spines on the eyelids, which further enhances the illusion (Megophrys montana). While others, such as Leptobrachella mjobergi, are small, with digital discs and are found on rocks along streams. Some megophryids have pond-type tadpoles; others have stream-dwelling tadpoles, some are with surface-feeding mouths and some with large buccal areas for clinging to rocks. All megophryids for which data are available have unusually ossified intervertebral disks, and hyoid plates that lack most of the ceratohyals. There are no known fossils.
Boulenger (1920) followed Annandale (1917) to include Rana pleskei in the amphibian fauna of Kashmir. In 1956 a small frog, SMF 64483, (snout-vent length 31 mm), collected from a village Lun Bangla (at the border with Azad Kashmir), was deposited in the Senckenberg Museum, Frankfurt, Germany (SMF), by late Dr. Ahsanul Islam (Government College, Natural History Museum, Lahore). Mertens (1969) identified the specimen as Nanorana pleskei, later Dubois and Khan (1979) referred the specimen as Rana vicina. However, probably due to priority Mertens identification was followed by the subsequent authors to include Nanorana pleskei in fauna of Pakistan (Khan,1980, 2003; Khan and Tasnim, 1987). In 1978, Dubois (1978) assigned the Azad Kashmir specimen and the tadpoles collected from Kashmir (Annandale, 1917) to Scutiger nyingchiensis Fei, 1977, family Megophryidae. Sahi and Duda (1986) were confusedly quoted the authority of Dubois (1978) to include Nanorana pleskei in the fauna of Jammu and Kashmir, rather then Scutiger nyingchiensis.

References: The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species

Leave a Reply